Tag Archives: superheroes

Ultimate comics: Spider-man

Ultimate comics : Spider-Man / Brian Michael Bedis ; Sara Pichelli

So, this is a series I’ve watned to review for a while but since it’s in “decompressed” Marvel style it’s been kind of difficult to do so because I wasn’t finding a good “cutoff” point for which volumes to review. It wasn’t until recently (I’m writing this in November) when I realized that the series called Ultimate comics: Spider-man had in fact been cancelled and was being continued under a new name with new numbering.

“Perfect!” says I, “now I’ve got a defined set of issues to review, since I already own the whole series”.

I also says to myself “that would explain why nobody ever has volume 6 of this series”.

Background info aside, here’s the review.

Ultimate comics: Spider-man is a 28-issue series about a boy who is bitten by a spider who then gains spider-themed superpowers. Spider-man must then attempt to come to terms with the fact that with great power comes great responsibility. Spider-man is also forced to juggle school, friendships, and the risks associated with keeping his Spider-man identity and his Miles Morales identity separate.

Wait, Miles Morales? I thought Peter Parker was Spider-man…

Well, here’s the point where it becomes necessary to dive into …

THE PLOT SUMMARY

While celebrating his acceptence at a prestigious private high school in New York City at his uncle Aaron’s home, Miles Morales is bitten by a mysterious spider and gains superpowers. Coincidentally, sometime later Spider-man is killed and his secret identity is revealed to the world.

With the help of a store-bought Hallowe’en costume, Miles Morales decides to continue the work Peter Parker started.

Continue reading Ultimate comics: Spider-man

That demon Continuity

“A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds”

-Self reliance, Ralph Waldo Emerson

I haven’t made a non-review post and my actual reviews seem to be getting increasingly ranty so here’s a rant without a specific title in mind.

As I’ve mentioned previously, while I’ve always been a huge fan of comics I’ve been inconsistent over the years when it comes to the superhero stuff.

In my review of Identity crisis I mentioned that it was one of the titles that got me reading superhero comics again after an extended period of consuming Vertigo and Dark Horse titles more or less exclusively. I’ve been reading a lot of comic sites lately, and it seems that one of the more common criticisms of Identity crisis is that it “tainted” the characters, especially their earlier appearances. More innocent adventures took on a sinister undertone after the revelations of Identity crisis.

This is the scourge of the demon Continuity.

People also complained about Identity crisis because they felt like the characterization was inconsistent with the way those heroes were portrayed in other titles.

This is the scourge of the demon Continuity.

Continue reading That demon Continuity

Identity crisis

Identity crisis / by Brad Meltzer ; art by Rags Morales.

It’s been a while since I did reviewed any comics, so here’s a new one.

Identity crisis was one of DC’s pretty much annual summer crossover spectaculars, where Things Will Change Forever. Identity crisis was far more controversial than most of the other comics with “crisis” in the title, and (perhaps unintentionally?) set the mainstream superhero comics industry down a path of darker and darker stories that culminated in another big Summer Event, Infinite crisis.

I may or may not review Infinite crisis at some point in the future. It depends on whether or not I have the willpower to force myself to read it again.

Identity crisis is controversial mostly because of its unusually adult content for a summer crossover. I’ll be dealing with that in a separate section towards the end of the review so that readers who don’t want to read about it, either because they haven’t read the title or aren’t comfortable with it won’t have to.

Brief plot summary

(frustratingly vague to avoid spoiling much at all)

Identity crisis is a combination of domestic drama and mystery novel. The spouse of a member of the Justice League of America is murdered. The JLA bands together to solve the murder. When threatening letters are sent to the spouses of other heroes, the JLA must deal with the possibility that a serial killer might know their secret identities.

Continue reading Identity crisis