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One good earl deserves a lover

One good earl deserves a lover / Sarah MacLean

I find myself increasingly reading historical romance. I find myself getting tired of so-called ‘Hard” science fiction which feels more like an exercise in dull determinism than an enjoyable reading experience. I’m also growing a little bored with the endless large-scale melodrama of fantasy and “soft” science fiction. Mystery novels almost invariably end up being too predictable or devoting themselves to defending Status Q.  Ostensibly “Literary” fiction either ends up drowning in angst or featuring “important” statements about social problems that I end up dealing with enough in my daily life that I don’t have the energy to deal with them in fiction. I know other people who feel this way – most of them have gravitated towards YA fiction which is reasonable but it’s an area where I’m frequently overwhelmed and for some reason I’m more comfortable being seen in the Romance section than I am in the YA section.

So in the interest of reading something not inflated by its own self-importance that manages to be at least minimally witty I find myself reading historical romance novels pretty much by default. (It also helps that my spouse is a fan of the genre so they are also readily available and I have a plausible excuse when people see me buying them or checking them out of the library.  As a result of all this Sarah MacLean has become one of my favorite authors. She does a good job of telling an entertaining, frequently hilarious story without whitewashing how horrible living conditions were for the vast majority of the population of Regency England.

This is the second book in the Rules of scoundrels series, a quartet of novels mostly notable for the fact that none of the major characters are leading lights of the ton and none of them have the excess of social capital that usually makes problems go away in these kinds of books.

Brief plot summary

Pippa, sister of the protagonist of the previous volume, is an intellectual young lady with a problem. Her fiancé is notoriously dull and she herself has no idea how a marriage is supposed to “work”. In an effort to learn more about relationships she enlists Cross, one of the four owners of the town’s most notorious hell, the Fallen angel.

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